Litvak Contemporary, Tel Aviv

Shvil Hamifal 3, Kiryat Hamelacha, Tel-Aviv, Israel

info@remove.me @litvakcontemporary.com

www.litvakcontemporary.com

 

 

About The Exhibition 

Litvak Contemporary’s Volta NY exhibition, titled Chronus and Kairos, includes photography and paintings by two Israeli artists: Boaz Aharonovich and Dana Pakman.

Aharonovich’s work utilizes satellite imagery and other photographs taken via advanced space research technologies. These images capture the Supernova phenomena — the explosion and collapse of stars — which mark the end of their life cycle. The light hitting the fragments of such explosions creates a brilliant chromatic aura, fusing sublime beauty with violence and destruction. Aharonovich then takes images from the explosions and merges them, adding and subtracting data, adding and subtracting dimensions of time. The images expand to capture and include all the known visible space, merging them into one image that contains all layers of time. By adding all these Supernovas into one frame, the artist stacks layers of time into one visible moment.

Pakman’s new body of work "Chronos and Kairos" and/or "Entropy" depicts classical sculptures in an impossible moment of explosions. Painted on wood, Pakman builds up layers of paint over months, capturing the volume of sculpture while also creating moments of painterly abstraction. Each work begins with a canonical sculpture that Pakman digitally manipulates, the resulting image becoming an inspiration and jumping off point for each painting. In a world that is increasingly fast-paced and impossible to grasp, Pakman captures the moment of explosive tension by carefully composing the instant before complete chaos. Describing her own process as a wish to hold on to a moment in time, Pakman dismantles recognizable forms into fragments and composes new pieces from the rubble, subverting their meaning and instilling them with new life.

Both artists use different mediums to control and shape time. Capturing an imaginary, yet precise, moment in each of Pakman’s paintings while Aharonovich simultaneously represents multiple moments of time in each photograph. Both artists attempt to step out of Chronos, known as linear time, and to live in Kairos, the proper or opportune time for action.

Statement – Dana Pakman 

The subject of my work ranges from the intimate and personal to broader social and cultural issues, though the lines are often blurred as I find a connection to the human condition in everything I do. 

In my new body of work "Chronos and Kairos" and/or “Entropy" I depict classical sculptures in an impossible moment of explosion. Painted on wood, each work takes months to complete, building up layers of paint that capture the volume of sculptures while also creating moments of painterly abstraction. Each work begins with a canonical sculpture that I digitally manipulate in order to explore and control each rupture, this image becomes an inspiration and guide for the resulting painting. This symbiotic relationship between traditional painting techniques and modern technology creates a new visual language, the means of production and source material subsumed and transformed by the painting process.

The classical sculptures that I have chosen are, at this point in history, signifiers for much more than what I believe was originally intended. They have become instrumental in disseminating ideas and narratives throughout history about culture, dominance, and art. In a world that is increasingly fast-paced and impossible to grasp, I capture the moment of explosion by carefully composing the instant before complete chaos. It is a wish to hold on to a moment in time. And yet, by dismantling recognizable forms into fragments and composing new pieces from the rubble, I aim to subvert their meaning and instill them with new life.

Statement – Boaz Aharonovitch 

The sources of the tensions that appear in my works are the result of a dual movement towards and away from images. It seems to me that I am at the same time possessed by images, and horrified by their power. I am constantly restraining and unleashing them. Numerous images are collected, manipulated, indexed, processed, enjoyed, and even metabolized. They are then turned into a single image – a spectacular, captivating yet horrifying image. An image that magnifies the multitude of images and at the same time abolishes them, as they become redundant in the face of the single image. 

The single image unites time and places, thereby undermining the singularity of the photographic medium – its ambition to capture a moment in time, a frame in space. The images are disarmed of their original context. The single image thus becomes a different sort of representation. It is a representation of a conceptual occurrence.

The image that appears before the viewer is the endpoint of a long journey. It is the exhaustion of a certain visual quest, one that resists the single image, and at the same time is aimed at one, an ideal one. Each work seduces the viewer into a visual labyrinth, but offers no way out, no exit and no grip point. The works raise questions, which are relevant now, in the digital age, more than ever, regarding our control over images, and their control over us. 

Boaz Aharonovitch
Dark Matter 1
2019, Archival pigment print, 43 x 43 in.
Boaz Aharonovitch
Dark Matter 7
2019, Archival pigment print, 43 x 43 in.
Boaz Aharonovitch
Dark Matter (installation view)
2019, Archival pigment prints, 130 x 86.5 in.
Dana Pakman
The Kiss
2018, Oil on wood, 24 x 24 in.