GALERIE LOUIS GENDRE + MORI YU GALLERY, Paris / Kyoto

GALERIE LOUIS GENDRE

6, Villa Soutine, 75014 Paris, France

contact@remove.me @galerielouisgendre.com

MORI YU GALLERY

4-19 Rengezo-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 6068357, Japan

info@remove.me @moriyu-gallery.com

When looking at Sakae Ozawa’s paintings, one's eyes are dazzled by the brilliant colors. The diverse elements of the painting — the harmonies and contrasts between juxtaposed colors, the transparency of the paint applied over the black ground, and the sense of floating created by light brushstrokes — are unconsciously synthesized in the retina of the viewer, making each color glow brightly. The unique color sense found in Ozawa's paintings is, of course, an inborn gift, but the artist is very aware of how her colors look on the canvas. She often starts a painting by assembling areas of color. She tests the effect of new techniques and different kinds of brushstrokes, scattering them casually but carefully over the surface of the canvas.

That is why Ozawa's paintings grab theviewer's gaze and do not let go, producing a rich visual experience that might thought to show the essence of painting. Ozawa frequently treats such motifs as night skies, forests, animals, and young girls, as in the work shown here, creating fantasy scenes. She often poses figures so that they are seen from the back, like the young girl wearing a blue dress. These figures play the part of actors, leading the viewer into an extraordinary space. The girl is also the alter ego of the creator of this picture, always looking at the world spreading out before her. According to Ozawa, "How I see the world becomes the painting." The painting is extracted from a worldview developed in the artist's actual life, a different view of the real world rather than a scene from a particular fantasy. Ozawa's paintings lead to a chain of visual experiences — seeing, continuing to see, and coming to see. Two years have passed since she returned to Japan from study in Vienna. What will she do in the environment of Japan and how will it change her work? The potential for her development is immeasurable.

― Chika MORI, Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo

Sakae Ozawa, Galaxy from the fingertip, 2010, Oil on canvas, 130 x 356 cm
Sakae Ozawa, Idola’s House, 2007, Oil on canvas, 160 x 130 cm
Sakae Ozawa, Bring the night, 2016, Oil on canvas, 60 x 46 cm
Sakae Ozawa, The wood of this star, 2016, Oil on canvas, 194 x 194 cm
Sakae Ozawa, 0.5 Sekunden auf einen Planet, 2011, Oil on canvas, 181 x 227 cm
Sakae Ozawa, Promised Day, 2016, Oil on canvas, 97 x 130 cm